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Icelandic Times – Issue 24

Weather-wise, this winter has been excep­tionally unpredictable, and the natural elements have been overly generous in every single category. An old Icelandic joke says, “If you don’t like the weather, you should just wait few minutes and it will change”. Lately, it has striven especially hard to live up to its questionable reputation by pouring out samples from every class of its inventory. In a short period, Iceland has seen calm, snowy periods when an exquisite winter cloak graces the land with bright red sunrises or clear, starlit skies, so you might easily feel that you have accidentally landed in a fantasy fairy tale. Moments later, Mother Nature has been less compassionate as fierce storms and blizzards swept across the land. You could wake up one morning and find, to your surprise, that the abundance of yesterday’s snow has turned into slush – or that it has disappeared entirely. This is usually the result of sudden rise in te

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mperature, often accompanied by heavy rains, including the notorious horizontal rain, when stormy winds join in. Given the frequent changes of the weather this winter, you can be certain of absolute uncertainty when it comes to how the weather will be during your stay. So please prepare yourself well and make the best of what you are handed!

The Beautiful Aurora Borealis

As the winter darkness seeps in with shortened days, the chance to observe the renowned Northern Lights increases significantly. Although this magnificent natural phenomena persists all year around, it can only be seen in the darkness of winter. This year has been magnificent for all lovers of the Northern Lights, with superb spectacles of dancing Aurora Borealis in various colours, ranging from green and red to purple. The displays can sometimes go on continuously for days and even weeks. We highly recommend that you take the time to see the phenomena with some of Iceland’s many qualified tour operators who have specialized in this field. You will not be disappointed when you catch a glimpse of these impressive light-curtains sashaying through the earth’s atmosphere.

Extended use of Christmas lights

City of Reykjavík seen from Hallgrímskirkja tower

City of Reykjavík seen from Hallgrímskirkja tower

Other types of lights that are a common sight in Iceland are Christmas lights, both in homes, institutions and private companies. You shouldn’t be surprised to see that Christmas lights stay up long past their intended season. This is simply an attempt to brighten up the lives of both locals and travellers alike during the dark winter time. We hope that you will experience and enjoy as many of the local eccentricities that Iceland has to offer during your visit. As always, be careful and have a wonderful holiday. – Edda Snorradóttir

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Icelandic Times – Issue 24

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